Viewing entries posted in January 2016

Strictly Spatial #7

Strictly Spatial 7

Posted by on 28 January 2016

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 Hope you’re all getting back into the swing of things after Christmas break. Here at Interpret we are full steam ahead and powering through work. In this edition of Strictly Spatial we give you a break from work and take a glance at how Ebola and chocolate are effecting the African Great Ape populations, how three words (or emojis) can be used to give you your location anywhere in the world and look at the global distribution of Submarine Cables.

How do Ebola and Chocolate work together to effect the African Great Ape population? Well, they take a two prong approach. Since the 1990’s one third of the African Great Ape population has been killed by Ebola and every year, we (humans) cut down their native habitat. This cleared land is making way for agriculture to produce cocoa (chocolate), coffee and palm oil. Have a look at this Esri story map by the African Wildlife Foundation. It’s a great example of how story maps can be used to convey information.

Do you know where ‘Youth.Paused.Vote’ is? How about ‘Plants.Trap.Spins’? Well, these three word combinations can be used to find Interprets’ Office, and The ChristChurch Cathedral – much easier to remember than 43° 32' 29.4504'' S 172° 38' 17.8152'' E and 43° 31' 51.8160'' S 172° 38' 12.3648'' E! These are generated by the What3Words which divides the world into 3m x 3m squares; 57 trillion of them. Each of these squares are identified by a combination of three unique words. There are other sites where you can use emojis or pictures to state your location. Whoever thought emojis could be useful?

Recently, you might have heard about plans for a new submarine communications cable to connect New Zealand to Australia. With that in mind have a look at the history of the ‘Underwater Internet’ – not very spatial, but interesting none the less. However, to bring us back to our cartographic routes, Telegeography has created a medieval and renaissance inspired map of submarine cables. Even Esri has jumped on the bandwagon and have produced an interactive 3D map show casing (what appears to be) their still-to-be-released 3D JavaScript API.

The development of high capacity, high speed motorway and highway networks help to support the movement of people and goods in and out of cities. Often, the construction of these roads require people to leave their homes and cause communities to be split apart. Using Areal imagery, Tim Kovach looks at how the construction of freeways have torn apart Cleveland’s (USA) neighbourhoods. Check it out here.

Interpret are Esri partners and make use of their wide variety of tools and software. As we all know, there are plenty of other options out there. This article maps out (excuse the pun) the ‘GIS Software Landscape’ and takes a look at the different software options available. I’ve only ever heard of a handful of these, most of which are in the top 15!

That’s it for this edition of Strictly Spatial. If you have any cool GIS, Geography or Spatial stories you want to share with us, find us on Twitter and Facebook, or email us at info@interpret.co.nz.

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Interpret New Staff: Phillip and Faisal

Phillip Faisal Casual White Low

Posted by on 28 January 2016

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We are pleased to announce that Interpret has two new staff members, Phillip Smith and Faisal Abbas. Phillip (left) joins the company as a Principal Consultant. He has a wealth of theoretical, management and advisory expertise in the use of spatial data for business benefit, which he gained in academia, government and the private sector across New Zealand, UK and the Middle East.

Faisal (right) is a Senior Consultant and started his career in Pakistan in academia before moving to the private sector. During his seven years working at Experience International (a development management service company), he grew the business from one person to a team of 15 and increased their GIS capability to better service client needs.

We are delighted to welcome Phillip and Faisal to our team.

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GIS Job Opportunity

Posted by on 25 January 2016

The University of Canterbury is currently looking for a spatially enabled individual to fill a management role in the newly established Geospatial Research Institute, Toi Hangarau. The GRI Toi Hangarau is a research centre dedicated to outward-facing, collaborative geospatial research and innovation. You will be involved in connecting research to business, government, iwi and community end users. If you think you have what it takes check out the job advert here.

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Strictly Spatial #6

Strictly Spatial #6

Posted by on 14 January 2016

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Welcome to the start of 2016. The Interpret Team hope you all had a relaxing break and are raring to go in 2016! In this edition of Strictly Spatial we take a step back in time and look at some historic maps, investigate the global distribution of your surname and look at the earth in a novel new way and more!

The David Rumsey Map Collection has a huge collection of all sorts of historic maps, atlases and cartographic visuals. There are a few New Zealand maps, one of which is an 1843 map of New Zealand. What makes this website stand out is that the old maps have been georeferenced and overlaid on modern day imagery. If georeferencing historic maps is your sort of thing, check out the georeferencer application where you can help to georeference maps in the David Ramsey Map Collection.

Forebears is website specialising in genealogy. Search your surname and it will tell how common it is, where it’s most prevalent and has the highest density. The data is displayed on a choropleth map. It even has the ability to show the distribution within (certain) countries. It’s a fun website, go and see how unique (or common) your surname is!

Did you visit some exotic places over the break? The Earthview website has found ‘the most striking and enigmatic landscapes’ on Google Earth. Many of them look like they could be from an alien planet. Have a look and see if you can recognise any locations. If any particular ones take your fancy, you are able to use them as your desktop wallpaper – great for that mini escape from work!

Cartograms are very effective at showing distributions. Many of you have probably seen a global cartogram like the one pictured before. Every time I see one it amazes me how much China and India take control of the map and countries like Russia, Australia and North America become very small. One thing that stands out for me in this map is the amount of colours used! Clearly the author(s) of this map has not heard of the four colour theorem! Either way, check it out and see how different countries look when scaled by their population.

Over the break I imagine many of you would have been asked, what do you do for a job? I find the answer of ‘GIS’ often results in a blank stare and the question, ‘What is GIS?’. How do you reply? Do you sheepishly answer with ‘I make maps’ or ‘GIS is like Google Maps; but better’? I often go with the latter and from the response given, may or may not go into further details. An article by Matt Sheehan explores how we, as GIS Professionals can give a meaning full answer to ‘what is your job’ question.

That’s it for this edition of Strictly Spatial. If you have any cool GIS, Geography or Spatial stories you want to share with us, find us on Twitter and Facebook, or email us at info@interpret.co.nz.

 

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